What is your MBTI equivalent ?

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Alex Chap
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What is your MBTI equivalent ?

Post by Alex Chap » 22 Nov 2018 23:07

Hello everyone,

I'm having a strong interest in the famous MBTI personnality test since several months and I like to study how it works. I was wondering if I could obtain some results from interesting or close people, I began with friends, family, and now ... Why not the TR community from trle.net ? It's just about curiousity and it could add some ambiant here. :)

I know that the test is quite obsolete nowadays, but I find it very interesting in the way it shows how every people communicate or work most of the time in their everyday life.

For those who don't know, the MBTI test defines you with 4 letters :

- I / E (Introversion/Extraversion)
- N / S (iNtuition/Sensation)
- T / F (Thinking/Feeling)
- J / P (Judgement/Perception)


You can try it here : https://www.16personalities.com

Remember that it's not an accurate test and gives you a sort of archetype among 16, you can even change frequently your type with time but it stills a good way to guide you.

For my part, I'm an ISFJ, it's one of the most common type, but funny enough, males are rare in this category.

And you ? Whats your MBTI ? :)

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Re: What is your MBTI equivalent ?

Post by Jorge22 » 23 Nov 2018 11:07

Well, if you really want to know, this is what the test came up with:

Mediator: INFP-T

MEDIATOR PERSONALITY (INFP, -A/-T)
Mediator personalities are true idealists, always looking for the hint of good in even the worst of people and events, searching for ways to make things better. While they may be perceived as calm, reserved, or even shy, Mediators have an inner flame and passion that can truly shine. Comprising just 4% of the population, the risk of feeling misunderstood is unfortunately high for the Mediator personality type – but when they find like-minded people to spend their time with, the harmony they feel will be a fountain of joy and inspiration.

Mediator personality
Being a part of the Diplomat Role group, Mediators are guided by their principles, rather than by logic (Analysts), excitement (Explorers), or practicality (Sentinels). When deciding how to move forward, they will look to honor, beauty, morality and virtue – Mediators are led by the purity of their intent, not rewards and punishments. People who share the Mediator personality type are proud of this quality, and rightly so, but not everyone understands the drive behind these feelings, and it can lead to isolation.

All that is gold does not glitter; not all those who wander are lost; the old that is strong does not wither; deep roots are not reached by the frost.

J. R. R. Tolkien
We Know What We Are, but Know Not What We May Be
At their best, these qualities enable Mediators to communicate deeply with others, easily speaking in metaphors and parables, and understanding and creating symbols to share their ideas. Fantasy worlds in particular fascinate Mediators, more than any other personality type. The strength of their visionary communication style lends itself well to creative works, and it comes as no surprise that many famous Mediators are poets, writers and actors. Understanding themselves and their place in the world is important to Mediators, and they explore these ideas by projecting themselves into their work.

Mediators have a talent for self-expression, revealing their beauty and their secrets through metaphors and fictional characters.
Mediators’ ability with language doesn’t stop with their native tongue, either – as with most people who share the Diplomat personality types, they are considered gifted when it comes to learning a second (or third!) language. Their gift for communication also lends itself well to Mediators’ desire for harmony, a recurring theme with Diplomats, and helps them to move forward as they find their calling.

Listen to Many People, but Talk to Few
Unlike their Extraverted cousins though, Mediators will focus their attention on just a few people, a single worthy cause – spread too thinly, they’ll run out of energy, and even become dejected and overwhelmed by all the bad in the world that they can’t fix. This is a sad sight for Mediators’ friends, who will come to depend on their rosy outlook.

If they are not careful, Mediators can lose themselves in their quest for good and neglect the day-to-day upkeep that life demands. Mediators often drift into deep thought, enjoying contemplating the hypothetical and the philosophical more than any other personality type. Left unchecked, Mediators may start to lose touch, withdrawing into “hermit mode”, and it can take a great deal of energy from their friends or partner to bring them back to the real world.

Luckily, like the flowers in spring, Mediator’s affection, creativity, altruism and idealism will always come back, rewarding them and those they love perhaps not with logic and utility, but with a world view that inspires compassion, kindness and beauty wherever they go.
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Mediator strengths

Idealistic – Mediators’ friends and loved ones will come to admire and depend on them for their optimism. Their unshaken belief that all people are inherently good, perhaps simply misunderstood, lends itself to an incredibly resilient attitude in the face of hardship.
Seek and Value Harmony – People with the Mediator personality type have no interest in having power over others, and don’t much care for domineering attitudes at all. They prefer a more democratic approach, and work hard to ensure that every voice and perspective is heard.
Open-Minded and Flexible – A live-and-let-live attitude comes naturally to Mediators, and they dislike being constrained by rules. Mediators give the benefit of the doubt too, and so long as their principles and ideas are not being challenged, they’ll support others’ right to do what they think is right.
Very Creative – Mediators combine their visionary nature with their open-mindedness to allow them to see things from unconventional perspectives. Being able to connect many far-flung dots into a single theme, it’s no wonder that many Mediators are celebrated poets and authors.
Passionate and Energetic – When something captures Mediators’ imagination and speaks to their beliefs, they go all in, dedicating their time, energy, thoughts and emotions to the project. Their shyness keeps them from the podium, but they are the first to lend a helping hand where it’s needed.
Dedicated and Hard-Working – While others focusing on the challenges of the moment may give up when the going gets tough, Mediators (especially Assertive ones) have the benefit of their far-reaching vision to help them through. Knowing that what they are doing is meaningful gives people with this personality type a sense of purpose and even courage when it comes to accomplishing something they believe in.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Mediator weaknesses

Too Idealistic – Mediators often take their idealism too far, setting themselves up for disappointment as, again and again, evil things happen in the world. This is true on a personal level too, as Mediators may not just idealize their partners, but idolize them, forgetting that no one is perfect.
Too Altruistic – Mediators sometimes see themselves as selfish, but only because they want to give so much more than they are able to. This becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy, as they try to push themselves to commit to a chosen cause or person, forgetting to take care of the needs of others in their lives, and especially themselves.
Impractical – When something captures Mediators’ imagination, they can neglect practical matters like day-to-day maintenance and simple pleasures. Sometimes people with the Mediator personality type will take this asceticism so far as to neglect eating and drinking as they pursue their passion or cause.
Dislike Dealing With Data – Mediators are often so focused on the big picture that they forget the forest is made of individual trees. Mediators are in tune with emotions and morality, and when the facts and data contradict their ideals, it can be a real challenge for them.
Take Things Personally – Mediators often take challenges and criticisms personally, rather than as inspiration to reassess their positions. Avoiding conflict as much as possible, Mediators will put a great deal of time and energy into trying to align their principles and the criticisms into a middle ground that satisfies everybody.
Difficult to Get to Know – Mediators are private, reserved and self-conscious. This makes them notoriously difficult to really get to know, and their need for these qualities contributes to the guilt they often feel for not giving more of themselves to those they care about.

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MEDIATOR RELATIONSHIPS

Mediators are dreamy idealists, and in the pursuit of the perfect relationship, this quality shows strongest. Never short on imagination, Mediators dream of the perfect relationship, forming an image of this pedestalled ideal that is their soul mate, playing and replaying scenarios in their heads of how things will be. This is a role that no person can hope to fill, and people with the Mediator personality type need to recognize that nobody’s perfect, and that relationships don’t just magically fall into place – they take compromise, understanding and effort.

Mediator romantic relationships
Love All, Trust a Few, Do Wrong to None
Fortunately these are qualities that Mediators are known for, and while it can be a challenge to separate long-fostered fantasy from reality, Mediators’ tendency to focus their attention on just a few people in their lives means that they will approach new relationships wholeheartedly, with a sense of inherent value, dedication and trust.

Mediators share a sincere belief in the idea of relationships – that two people can come together and make each other better and happier than they were alone, and they will take great efforts to show support and affection in order to make this ideal a reality.
But Mediators aren’t necessarily in a rush to commit – they are, after all, Prospecting (P) types, and are almost always looking to either establish a new relationship or improve an existing one – they need to be sure they’ve found someone compatible. In dating, Mediators will often start with a flurry of comparisons, exploring all the ways the current flame matches with the ideal they’ve imagined. This progression can be a challenge for a new partner, as not everyone is able to keep up with Mediators’ rich imagination and moral standards – if incompatibilities and conflict over this initial rush mount, the relationship can end quickly, with Mediators likely sighing that “it wasn’t meant to be.”

As a relationship takes hold, people with the Mediator personality type will show themselves to be passionate, hopeless romantics, while still respecting their partners’ independence. Mediators take the time to understand those they care about, while at the same time helping them to learn, grow and change. While Mediators are well-meaning, not everyone appreciates what can come across as constantly being told that they need to improve – or, put another way, that they’re not good enough. Mediators would be aghast to find that their intents were interpreted this way, but it’s a real risk, and if their partner is as averse to conflict as Mediators themselves, it can boil under the surface for some time before surfacing, too late to fix.

Better Three Hours Too Soon Than a Minute Too Late
This aversion to conflict, while contributing greatly to stability in the relationship when done right, is probably the most urgent quality for Mediators to work on. Between their sensitivity and imagination, Mediators are prone to internalizing even objective statements and facts, reading into them themes and exaggerated consequences, sometimes responding as though these comments are metaphors designed to threaten the very foundations of their principles. Naturally this is almost certainly an overreaction, and Mediators should practice what they preach, and focus on improving their ability to respond to criticism with calm objectivity, rather than irrational accusations and weaponized guilt.

But that’s at their uncommon worst – at their best, Mediators do everything they can to be the ideal partner, staying true to themselves and encouraging their partners to do the same. Mediators take their time in becoming physically intimate so that they can get to know their partners, using their creativity to understand their wants and needs, and adapt to them. People with this personality type are generous in their affection, with a clear preference for putting the pleasure of their partners first – it is in knowing that their partners are satisfied that Mediators truly feel the most pleasure.

_________________________________________________________

MEDIATOR FRIENDS

The true friends of people with the Mediator personality type tend to be few and far between, but those that make the cut are often friends for life. The challenge is the many dualities that this type harbors when it comes to being sociable – Mediators crave the depth of mutual human understanding, but tire easily in social situations; they are excellent at reading into others’ feelings and motivations, but are often unwilling to provide others the same insight into themselves – it’s as though Mediators like the idea of human contact, but not the reality of social contact.


How Poor Are They That Have Not Patience

In a lot of ways, this limits the potential pool of friends to other types in the Diplomat Role group, who are able to pick up on the subtle clues left by their Mediator friends, and who are more likely than not to enjoy something of a human enigma. A friendship with a Turbulent Executive (ESTJ-T) on the other hand, governed by social conventions and community participation as they are, would almost be a non-sequitur – though Mediators may find the idea of being paired with their opposite fascinating enough to outweigh the practical challenges to such a friendship.

To top it all off, ideas like networking and “the friend of my friend is my friend” hold little weight with Mediators. Friendships are earned on their own merit, by dint of the intuitive respect Mediators have for those with similar principles and values, rather than more practical alignments like those of coworkers. Mediators’ tendency to protect their sensitive inner cores and values from criticism, especially if they are on the more turbulent side of the spectrum, means that acquaintances will likely get nowhere near them without sustained and tactful effort.

But, if Mediators’ shields are properly navigated and they decide to open up and trust another person, a strong, stable friendship will ensue, marked by passionate support and idealism, subtle poetic wit, and a level of emotional insight that is hard to match. Mediators’ friends will be rewarded with calm, sensitivity and depth, and an ever-present desire to help, learn, and grow. But even the most confident and assertive Mediators will only be able to keep up this relaxed and present exterior for so long.

Even as friendships grow stronger and deeper, and friends are lulled into a sense of mutual understanding, Mediators’ enigmatic qualities will never truly vanish.
Mediators will always need to disappear for a while, removing themselves from others so they can re-center on their own minds and feelings. Often enough people with the Mediator personality type will emerge from this time alone having come to some momentous decision that even their closest friends didn’t know was weighing on them, evading even the option of receiving the sort of support and advice they so readily give. Such is Mediators’ way, for better or for worse.

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MEDIATOR PARENTS

People who share the Mediator personality type share a tendency to not only strive to learn and grow as principled, moral individuals, but to bring likeminded people on that journey with them. In their own subtle, often shy way, Mediators want to lead others forward, as kindred spirits – they will find no greater opportunity for this than in parenthood.

From the start, Mediator parents are warm, loving and supportive, and take immeasurable joy in the wide-eyed wonder of their children as they explore, learn, and grow. People with the Mediator personality type will give their children the freedom they need to do this, keeping an open mind and letting their children gain their own sense of understanding. At the same time, Mediator parents will try to provide a backdrop to this freedom and experience, establishing a set of morals and values that guide that liberty with a sense of personal responsibility.

Mediator parents
Mediators never stop encouraging their children to learn and grow, and they consider it their duty to inspire and motivate them, both by using their sensitivity and intuition to speak in their children’s language and by leading the way themselves.
However, this sense of responsibility has a harder side – if their children fall foul of their Mediator parents’ values, it will not be taken lightly. People with the Mediator personality type take their responsibilities in parenthood seriously, and in this measure above all others.

In some ways, Mediators’ tendency to hide their inner selves from view can be an advantage in parenting, as they are able to portray themselves as good role models on the outside, shielding their loved ones not just from their own occasional anger and depression, but from the broader evils in the world as well. This helps Mediators to demonstrate outwardly the moral lessons they want their children to adopt, and at the same time to establish a sense of harmony in the household.

Modest Doubt Is Called the Beacon of the Wise
The biggest challenge for Mediator parents, especially more Turbulent types who often have even more trouble with self-doubt than most, is to establish more practical and day-to-day structures and rules. Mediators may be able to convey the abstract value of honesty with remarkable skill, but it’s not always easy to equate that idea with the practical reality of their children being home from the movies when they said they were going to be, and it’s especially challenging when these misunderstandings result in conflict. In these situations, Mediator personalities do best with a partner who is able to play a stronger hand in more administrative tasks than they can, so they can focus on the underlying spirit of those rules.

____________________________________________________________

MEDIATOR CAREERS

It is perhaps more challenging for Mediators to find a satisfying career than any other type. Though intelligent, the regimented learning style of most schools makes long years earning an advanced degree a formidable undertaking for people with the Mediator personality type – at the same time, that’s often what’s needed to advance in a field that rings true for them. Mediators often wish that they could just be, doing what they love without the stress and rigor of professional life.

Oftentimes, as with so many things, the answer lies somewhere in the middle, in a line of work that begins with passion and dedication, but which comes to require training so that the academia feels intimately linked to that passion. Too many Mediators drift in frustration, ultimately succumbing to the necessities of day-to-day life in a job that wasn’t meant for them. But it turns out that, despite such exacting demands, modern economics places a premium on the very keys to Mediators’ challenges: their creativity, independence, and need for meaningful relationships with individuals who need their help.

Mediator careers
There’s Place and Means for Everyone
First and foremost is seemingly every Mediators’ dream growing up – to become an author. While a novel is a classic choice, it is rarely an accessible one, and there are many viable options for freedom-loving Mediators. The internet brings to the world the opportunities of blogging and freelance work – as organizations expand their reach beyond their native tongues, they will come to depend on Mediator personality types, with their gift for language and written expression, to take their rougher translations and stale pitches and inject them with a sense of beauty and poetry. Smaller organizations will need more than ever to express with elegance the value they bring to local communities.

Most any cause, idea, or field can benefit from the artful and natural expression that Mediators bring to the table, and Mediators have their pick of the world in choosing who they work with.
The real beauty here is that it takes a core interest that people with the Mediator personality type share, while helping a cause they believe in, independently, through creative expression and personal growth, and makes it applicable to any interest there is. There will always be a need, and now more than ever, to win people’s hearts and minds with the written word.

Some Mediators will prefer a still more personal touch, being able to work face-to-face with clients, seeing that their personal effort really impacts another’s quality of life. Service careers such as massage therapy, physical rehabilitation, counselling, social work, psychology and even academic roles and retraining can be exceptionally rewarding for Mediators, who take pride in the progress and growth they help to foster. People with the Mediator personality type have a tendency to put others’ interests ahead of their own, a mixed blessing by itself, but when a patient takes their first unaided step in the long road to recovery after an accident, nothing will feel more rewarding than that selflessness.

If to Do Were as Easy as to Know What Were Good to Do...
Where Mediators will not thrive is in a high-stress, team-heavy, busy environment that burdens them with bureaucracy and tedium. Mediators need to be able to work with creativity and consideration – high-pressure salespeople they are not. It can be a challenge to avoid these roles, as they are the basis for so much starting work, and it’s often a risk to break away into something less dependable, but more rewarding. To find a career that resonates with Mediators’ values though, that’s more than just a job, sometimes it’s just what needs to be done.

______________________________________________________________

MEDIATORS IN THE WORKPLACE

In the workplace, Mediators face the challenge of taking their work and their profession personally. To Mediators, if it isn’t worth doing, it isn’t really worth doing, and this sense of moral purpose in their work colors everything from how they respond to authority to how they express it. Though the way the Mediator personality type shows through depends on the position, there are a few basic truths about what Mediators seek in the workplace: they value harmony, need an emotional and moral connection to their work, and loathe bureaucratic tedium.

Mediator workplace habits
Mediator Subordinates
As subordinates, Mediators prefer latitude, and would much rather immerse themselves in a project, alone or with a close team, than simply be told what task to do and move on. People with the Mediator personality type aren’t looking for easy, forgettable work that pays the bills, they’re looking for meaningful work that they actually want to think about, and it helps for their managers to frame responsibilities in terms of emotional merit rather than cold rationalization or business for its own sake. Mediators would rather know that their work will help to deliver a service they believe in than to know that the bottom line has been boosted by 3%.

If these standards are met, managers will find an extremely dedicated and considerate employee in Mediators. As idealistic opportunity-seekers Mediators may not always work well in technical applications, where the facts and logic really matter and critique is often necessary, but they work beautifully in more human and creative endeavors. While some types, especially those in the Analyst Role group, respond favorably to negative feedback, taking criticism as an opportunity to not make the same mistake twice, people with the Mediator personality type would much rather hear what they did right and focus on what to do, rather than what not to.

Mediator Colleagues
Mediators feel most comfortable among colleagues – they aren’t interested in controlling others, and have a similar distaste for being controlled. Among their colleagues, Mediators will feel freer to share their ideas, and while they may maintain some psychological distance, they will make every effort to be pleasant, friendly and supportive – so long as their coworkers reciprocate. Mediators don’t like conflict or picking sides, and will do everything they can to maintain harmony and cooperation.

Most of this comes down to good communication, which Mediators prefer to conduct in person, for that personal touch, or in writing, where they can compose and perfect their statements. People with the Mediator personality type avoid using phones if they can, having the worst of both worlds, being both detached and uncomposed. Mediators also like to feel like their conversations are meaningful, and while they enjoy exploring philosophy more than most, their patience for arbitrary hypothetical brainstorming or dense technical discussions is limited.

Mediator Managers
As managers, Mediators are among the least likely to seem like managers – their egalitarian attitudes lend respect to every subordinate, preferring communication as human beings than as a boss/employee opposition. People with the Mediator personality type are flexible, open-minded and give their subordinates the tools they need, be they responsible delegation or an intuitive and receptive sounding board, to get the job done. Keeping their eyes on the horizon, Mediators set goals that achieve a desirable end, and help the people working under them to make that happen.

There is a downside to this style, as sometimes the boss just needs to be the boss. Mediators know how they feel about criticism, and are reluctant to subject others to that same experience, whether it’s needed or even welcome. Further complicating this role, when Mediators are under stress, as when someone really does warrant criticism, they can become extremely emotional – they may not show it, but it can affect their judgment, or even cause them to withdraw inwards, in ways that can really hold back their team.

_____________________________________________________________________________

Wow, so long! I really doubt anybody will read it. Or... everybody knows me now! :lol:
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Re: What is your MBTI equivalent ?

Post by Alex Chap » 23 Nov 2018 11:14

Oh my ... You just posted the entire result :lol:

In fact, I know well this text as I have a lot of good INFP friends around me even if they are only 4%, they understand me very well despite being quite distant sometimes.
I didn't expected that result for you on the first place, but more close to the Thinking and Judging side, but it explains why I feel comfy with you on this forum. :)

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Re: What is your MBTI equivalent ?

Post by Marksdad » 23 Nov 2018 11:25

I'm an Advocate INFJ
The Advocate personality type is very rare, making up less than one percent of the population, but they nonetheless leave their mark on the world
That'll do me!
I have to admit that two of the categories resulted in extremely bordeline results - 49/51.
I'm not sure if 2% the other way would have changed the outcome.

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Re: What is your MBTI equivalent ?

Post by Alex Chap » 23 Nov 2018 11:31

There are probably a lot of Idealists here, also, I'm not sure but apparently the older you get and the closer your results are around 50%, meaning you have a good balance in interacting and making decisions. :)

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Re: What is your MBTI equivalent ?

Post by MichaelP » 23 Nov 2018 13:44

Defender (ISFJ-a) :D
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Re: What is your MBTI equivalent ?

Post by Jorge22 » 23 Nov 2018 15:48

Alex Chap wrote:
23 Nov 2018 11:14
Oh my ... You just posted the entire result :lol:

In fact, I know well this text as I have a lot of good INFP friends around me even if they are only 4%, they understand me very well despite being quite distant sometimes.
I didn't expected that result for you on the first place, but more close to the Thinking and Judging side, but it explains why I feel comfy with you on this forum. :)
I do think a lot. Judge not so much as it may seem. I admit I may be a bit paranoid about a few subjects but that's it.

This is what it scored in percentages, btw:

Mind - 46% extraverted/54% introverted;

Energy - 60% intuitive/ 40%observant;

Nature - 37% thinking/63% feeling;

Tactics (I think) - 36% judging/64% prospecting;

Identity - 29% assertive/71% turbulent.

I guarantee I answered truthfully! :D I don't know... :)
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Re: What is your MBTI equivalent ?

Post by eRIC » 23 Nov 2018 17:24

INFP-A Mediator

Mind - 43% extraverted/57% introverted;
Energy - 53% intuitive/ 47%observant;
Nature - 33% thinking/67% feeling;
Tactics - 49% judging/51% prospecting;
Identity - 51% assertive/49% turbulent.

Less turbulent than Jorge :D

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Re: What is your MBTI equivalent ?

Post by Alex Chap » 23 Nov 2018 17:30

In fact the feeling and thinking side is how you take your decisions. Do you take them because of personnal values ? Or are you more prone to take them by logic and reason ? :)

Happy to see that Michael is also an ISFJ. :)

Recently I got :

61% Introverted
59% Observant
76% Feeling
79% Judging
79% Turbulent

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Re: What is your MBTI equivalent ?

Post by Phil » 23 Nov 2018 20:02

For me it depends on the context. In some situations I'm an introvert, in others an extrovert.

Also, the judgment/perception category makes no sense to me. The two are not opposite concepts, and trying to contrast them is like matching apples and oranges. The more accurately you perceive things, the better able you are to make rational judgments concerning them.

I'm 100% slothful/ne'er-do-well, and that's pretty easy to measure, but I see no category for it.

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Re: What is your MBTI equivalent ?

Post by Phil » 23 Nov 2018 22:04

Alex Chap wrote:
23 Nov 2018 17:30
In fact the feeling and thinking side is how you take your decisions. Do you take them because of personnal values ? Or are you more prone to take them by logic and reason ?
My personal values are shaped by logic and reason, so the answer is yes.

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Re: What is your MBTI equivalent ?

Post by Jorge22 » 24 Nov 2018 14:02

eRIC wrote:
23 Nov 2018 17:24
INFP-A Mediator

Mind - 43% extraverted/57% introverted;
Energy - 53% intuitive/ 47%observant;
Nature - 33% thinking/67% feeling;
Tactics - 49% judging/51% prospecting;
Identity - 51% assertive/49% turbulent.

Less turbulent than Jorge :D
Turbulent hmmm....... whatever that means. :)
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Re: What is your MBTI equivalent ?

Post by eRIC » 24 Nov 2018 15:46

yep , exactly :lol:
if this very word Turbulent was used in French we would know what it means , but in English i'm not sure :dunno:

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Re: What is your MBTI equivalent ?

Post by JesseG » 24 Nov 2018 17:04

I got Architect (INTJ-T). Apparently it is only %2 of the population. "People with the Architect personality type are imaginative yet decisive, ambitious yet private, amazingly curious, but they do not squander their energy." Sounds about right. Although a lot of the text seems to exude a lot of self-confidence...not something I've ever thought to describe myself but maybe it is a possibility, at least in some areas.
eRIC wrote:
24 Nov 2018 15:46
yep , exactly :lol:
if this very word Turbulent was used in French we would know what it means , but in English i'm not sure :dunno:
The description says "This trait underpins all others, showing how confident we are in our abilities and decisions." I think Assertive means you dig in your heels more often, whereas Turbulent means you are more prone to change your views or decisions.

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Re: What is your MBTI equivalent ?

Post by Jorge22 » 24 Nov 2018 17:38

That means I'm flexible, I guess. Hopefully. As long as I make sense. :)
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